Special Gaston J. Glock Knives

knife_liner_lock_eurofighter_klappmesser_047_steckscheide_teylinlocke001After I had seen the Böker Tirpitz knife, I was amused that I stumbled upon these knives from Gaston J. Glock.  This folder’s blade is forged from the Mauser cannon of a Eurofigher aircraft.  Titanium and carbon fiber handles seem appropriate from this jet-age piece of cutlery.  Here are the specs:

  • This futuristic-looking pocket knife is constructed using only the highest quality materials, assembled and handcrafted with a lot of expertise. It possesses a harmonious style – a perfect knife for hunting wild boars.
  • The blade is made of 320-layer non-stainless Eurofighter Damascus steel using recycled elements from the on-board cannon Mauser BK-27 of a Eurofighter combat aircraft, and was handcrafted by Markus Balbach.
  • The inside planks are made of blue anodized grade 5 titanium.
  • The slip slices are made of bronze and the screws of stainless steel.
  • The handle is made of stable, lightweight carbon fiber.
  • Liner Lock Knife ─ the unlocking of the blade is triggered by pressing your thumb against the inside liner.
  • The sheath is made of traditionally-crafted manually stitched saddle leather. Solely vegetable tanning material is used during the tanning process.
  • Technical Information:
  • Total length: 7.28 inches (185 mm)
  • Blade length: 3.15 inches (80 mm)
  • Handle length: 4.18 inches (105 mm)
  • Blade strength: 0.12 inches (3.0 mm)
  • Hardness: 61° – 62° HRC
  • Pattern: Ladder Damascus

messer_gl001_largeOther knives in the Gaston Glock line feature full tang blades made from Glock 35 barrels used by competition shooter Dave Sevigny in training and in competition.

  • All-purpose hunting knife with extraordinary stability and full tang construction.
  • The full tang blade is made of non-stainless Damascus steel, recycled from the barrel of a Glock® 35 .40 caliber gun.
  • The steel was manufactured by Markus Balbach, a German blacksmith, and was folded to 320 layers by using old traditional handcraft.
  • The bolsters are made of the same Damascus steel and the handle itself is made of mammoth molar rind.
  • The light brow-colored sheath is made of traditionally crafted saddle leather. Solely vegetable tanning materials are used during the tanning process. The leather is re-tanned in drums over a period of 6 to 8 weeks.
  • Each knife is unique and comes with a serial number.
  • Information: 
    • Total length – 9.25 inches (235 mm)
    • Blade length – 4.53 inches (115 mm)
    • Blade strength – 0.18 inches (4.5 mm)
    • Pattern: Wild Damascus

messer_gl003-klinge_largeThis knife was made from the Glock 35 pistol barrel Dave Sevigny used to win the 2005 USPSA Limited-10 Nationals and 2006 USPSA Limited Nationals.  The handle is made of damascus and stabilized mammoth molar–well, that is different.

messer_gl002_largeThe pistol barrel Dave Sevigny used to win the 2008 and 2009 USPSA Limited-10 Nationals gave its all to make the Markus Balbach damascus steel in this last limited-edition offering from Gaston Glock.  The handles make-up is more damascus and mammoth ivory.

Only three of each of the fixed blades will be available.  Their prices range from $3,900 to $4,500.  Obviously, these are collectors’ knives.  The Mauser cannon folder comes at a more palatable $750, though.

Gaston Glock also sells other knives made from meteorites, Leopard battle tanks, and Heckler & Koch G-3 rifles, and, yes, the Tirpitz.  Like the Emerson World Trade Center knife or Terzuola’s U.S.S. Intrepid folder, all these knives are special by virtue of their historical components.

by Wilson

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